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Boy bullied for carrying My Little Pony backpack

A mother and her
9-year-old son say school officials won't let him bring a My Little Pony
bag to school.

The boy and his mother say he's getting shoved around because bullies
think his pick of a favorite toy is for girls.

It's a decades-old kids show where pony characters emphasize the bonds
of friendship.

It's become anything but friendship for 9-year-old Grayson Bruce.

Grayson Bruce, My Little Pony fan, "they're taking it a little too far,
with punching me, pushing me down, calling me horrible names, stuff that
really shouldn't happen."

Grayson picked a Rainbow Dash bag out this year, which he says has
intensified the attacks against him.

Grayson, "most of the characters in the show are girls, and most of the
people put it toward girls, most of the toys are girlie, and
surprisingly I found stuff like this."

Grayson has developed a following on Facebook after a friend made a
support page for him. Grayson stands by his favorite cartoon and the
message he says it sends. His mother says, why not?

Noreen Bruce, Grayson's mom, "it's promoting friendship, there's no bad
words, there's no violence, it's hard to find that, even in cartoons
now."

But Noreen says Thursday the school asked him to leave the bag at home
because it had become a distraction and was a "trigger for bullying."

Noreen, "saying a lunchbox is a trigger for bullying, is like saying a
short skirt is a trigger for rape. It's flawed logic, it doesn't make
any sense."

Noreen wants punishment for the students involved. Buncombe County
Schools declined an interview, but sent us this statement, "an initial
step was taken to immediately address a situation that had created a
disruption in the classroom. Buncombe County Schools takes bullying
very seriously, and we will continue to take steps to resolve this
issue."

So Grayson is using a different bag to carry his lunch to school, but he
and his mom say they don't believe it's right to force him to leave the
My Little Pony bag at home.

Read More at: http://www.wlos.com/shared/news/features/top-stories/stories/wlos_-school-bully-concerns-15463.shtmlA mother and her
9-year-old son say school officials won't let him bring a My Little Pony
bag to school.

The boy and his mother say he's getting shoved around because bullies
think his pick of a favorite toy is for girls.

It's a decades-old kids show where pony characters emphasize the bonds
of friendship.

It's become anything but friendship for 9-year-old Grayson Bruce.

Grayson Bruce, My Little Pony fan, "they're taking it a little too far,
with punching me, pushing me down, calling me horrible names, stuff that
really shouldn't happen."

Grayson picked a Rainbow Dash bag out this year, which he says has
intensified the attacks against him.

Grayson, "most of the characters in the show are girls, and most of the
people put it toward girls, most of the toys are girlie, and
surprisingly I found stuff like this."

Grayson has developed a following on Facebook after a friend made a
support page for him. Grayson stands by his favorite cartoon and the
message he says it sends. His mother says, why not?

Noreen Bruce, Grayson's mom, "it's promoting friendship, there's no bad
words, there's no violence, it's hard to find that, even in cartoons
now."

But Noreen says Thursday the school asked him to leave the bag at home
because it had become a distraction and was a "trigger for bullying."

Noreen, "saying a lunchbox is a trigger for bullying, is like saying a
short skirt is a trigger for rape. It's flawed logic, it doesn't make
any sense."

Noreen wants punishment for the students involved. Buncombe County
Schools declined an interview, but sent us this statement, "an initial
step was taken to immediately address a situation that had created a
disruption in the classroom. Buncombe County Schools takes bullying
very seriously, and we will continue to take steps to resolve this
issue."

So Grayson is using a different bag to carry his lunch to school, but he
and his mom say they don't believe it's right to force him to leave the
My Little Pony bag at home.

Read More at: http://www.wlos.com/shared/news/features/top-stories/stories/wlos_-school-bully-concerns-15463.shtmlNORTH CAROLINA (NEWSCHANNEL 3) - Bruce Grayson says he's being bullied for carrying a My Little Pony backpack.

"They're
taking it a little too far, with punching me, pushing me down, calling
me horrible names, stuff that really shouldn't happen," said Grayson.

The North Carolina 9-year-old feels the cartoon emphasizes friendship to children.

But he says his interest is causing him to be bullied by his classmates, who tell him his favorite toy is for girls.

Now Grayson's school has asked him to leave his bag at home because officials feel it's a trigger for bullying.

His mom disagrees and feels the school needs to punish the bullies for their actions.
A mother and her
9-year-old son say school officials won't let him bring a My Little Pony
bag to school.

The boy and his mother say he's getting shoved around because bullies
think his pick of a favorite toy is for girls.

It's a decades-old kids show where pony characters emphasize the bonds
of friendship.

It's become anything but friendship for 9-year-old Grayson Bruce.

Grayson Bruce, My Little Pony fan, "they're taking it a little too far,
with punching me, pushing me down, calling me horrible names, stuff that
really shouldn't happen."

Grayson picked a Rainbow Dash bag out this year, which he says has
intensified the attacks against him.

Grayson, "most of the characters in the show are girls, and most of the
people put it toward girls, most of the toys are girlie, and
surprisingly I found stuff like this."

Grayson has developed a following on Facebook after a friend made a
support page for him. Grayson stands by his favorite cartoon and the
message he says it sends. His mother says, why not?

Noreen Bruce, Grayson's mom, "it's promoting friendship, there's no bad
words, there's no violence, it's hard to find that, even in cartoons
now."

But Noreen says Thursday the school asked him to leave the bag at home
because it had become a distraction and was a "trigger for bullying."

Noreen, "saying a lunchbox is a trigger for bullying, is like saying a
short skirt is a trigger for rape. It's flawed logic, it doesn't make
any sense."

Noreen wants punishment for the students involved. Buncombe County
Schools declined an interview, but sent us this statement, "an initial
step was taken to immediately address a situation that had created a
disruption in the classroom. Buncombe County Schools takes bullying
very seriously, and we will continue to take steps to resolve this
issue."

So Grayson is using a different bag to carry his lunch to school, but he
and his mom say they don't believe it's right to force him to leave the
My Little Pony bag at home.

Read More at: http://www.wlos.com/shared/news/features/top-stories/stories/wlos_-school-bully-concerns-15463.shtmlBoy bullied for carrying My Little Pony backpack

Wednesday, March 19 2014, 10:29 AM EDT

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Police hunt for 2 who carjacked SUV, hit group selling fruit for church, killing 3 kids
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County official in Texas accused of taking bribes
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Former WWE champ Daniel Bryan catches suspected burglar
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Wis. police chief pleads no contest in Tea Party flap
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American Indian family says it has been stripped of tribal membership after contentious fight
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